facebooktwittertwitter

Contact A Counsellor

counsellor button

KNOW MORE

teen suicide icon

 

panic anxiety icon

panic anxiety icon

#MindfulMondays with Miss SA

teen suicide icon

IN THE WORKPLACE

Research on Depression in the Workplace.

For more information please click here

business

SADAG NEWSLETTER

email subscribers list

To subscribe to SADAG's newsletter, click here

To view previous newsletters - click here

MHM JOURNAL

Mental Health Matters Journal for Psychiatrists & GP's

MHM Volume 8 Issue1

Click here for more info

JOURNALISTS

journalists crew making newspaper

If you are a journalist writing a story contact Kayla on 011 234 4837  media@anxiety.org.za

MYSCHOOL

MySchool Facebook banner Nov

It’s the small things that make a BIG difference. Sign up for the “My School | My Village | My Planet” Card and start making a difference to Mental Health in South Africa today.

Click Here

SPEAKING BOOKS

cope with cancer book

Literacy is a luxury that many of us take for granted. That is why SADAG created SPEAKING BOOKS and revolutionized the way healthcare information is delivered to low literacy communities.

The customizable 16-page book, read by local celebrity audio recordings, ensures that vital health and social messages can be seen, heard, read and understood by everyone across the world.

We started with books on Teen Suicide prevention , HIV, AIDS and Depression, Understanding Mental Health and have developed over 100+ titles, such as TB, Malaria, Polio, Vaccines for over 45 countries.

suicide speaking book

Depression may double dementia risk, say researchers

Depressed elderly man

An estimated 750,000 people in the UK suffer from a form of dementia

Having depression may nearly double the risk of developing dementia later in life, new research suggests.

Experts know that the two conditions often co-exist, but it is not clear if one actually leads to the other.

Now two studies published in the American journal Neurology suggest depression does mean dementia is more likely, although they do not show why.

And the researchers stress that the findings merely reveal a link, not a direct cause.

They say more studies are needed to find out why the two conditions are linked.

They believe brain chemistry and lifestyle factors like diet and the amount of social time a person engages in may play a role.

Dr Jane Saczynski of the University of Massachusetts, who led the first of the two studies, said: "While it's unclear if depression causes dementia, there are a number of ways depression might impact the risk of dementia.

Continue reading the main story

What this study demonstrates is that depression at a younger age is probably a significant risk factor for dementia

Professor Clive Ballard The Alzheimer's Society

"Inflammation of brain tissue that occurs when a person is depressed might contribute to dementia. Certain proteins found in the brain that increase with depression may also increase the risk of developing dementia."

Her study, which followed 949 elderly people for 17 years, showed dementia more often followed a bout of depression.

By the end of the study, 164 of the people had developed dementia.

Specifically, 22% of those who had depression went on to develop dementia compared to 17% of those who did not have depression.

The second study, meanwhile, followed 1,239 US people and looked at the number of times a person experienced depression related to their risk of dementia.

It showed that the more times someone experienced depression, the higher their dementia risk was.

Having two or more episodes of depression nearly doubled the risk of dementia.

Rebecca Wood, chief executive of the Alzheimer's Research Trust, said: "Similarities in symptoms between dementia and depression can mean the two are sometimes confused at time of diagnosis, but we don't know if they are biologically linked.

"These latest studies suggest that there may be profound connections between dementia and depression so we must expand the research to find out more."

Professor Clive Ballard of the Alzheimer's Society agreed that more research was now needed to establish why the link exists.

"It is well known depression is common in early stages of dementia. What this study demonstrates is that depression at a younger age is probably a significant risk factor for dementia," he said.

 

Our Sponsors

Our Partners